Occasionally, I write original stuff and post it here. More commonly, this is where I store pictures of art, museum exhibits, film stills, and other stuff I find interesting.

 

asianartmuseum:

Happy National Dog Day! There’s really no need to go into why dogs are fantastic, or why every day should be dog day, right? And honestly, we just get excited about any opportunity to post about pups from our collection. This adorable little rascal is a ceramic from Northern China dated 25-220 AD. That’s like 26,910 in dog years.Want more dogs, or any flora and fauna? Search our collection here.

asianartmuseum:

Happy National Dog Day! There’s really no need to go into why dogs are fantastic, or why every day should be dog day, right? And honestly, we just get excited about any opportunity to post about pups from our collection. 

This adorable little rascal is a ceramic from Northern China dated 25-220 AD. That’s like 26,910 in dog years.

Want more dogs, or any flora and fauna? Search our collection here.

annotations:

Cleaning out my desk at school, I found a monster I doodled years ago into a German-language portfolio of architecture paintings.

annotations:

Cleaning out my desk at school, I found a monster I doodled years ago into a German-language portfolio of architecture paintings.

amnhnyc:

Happy National Dog Day! 

Pictured is the Hunting Dog diorama in the Akeley Hall of African Mammals. The scene, which takes place on the Serengeti Plain in Northern Tanzania, shows the predatory dogs with their gaze fixed on a distant grazing zebra. 

Roaming savannas and open woodlands in packs numbering up to thirty, hunting dogs run down their prey of gazelles, wildebeests, impalas, and zebras with great mastery. Traveling in over hundreds of square miles, they are successful in about 70 percent of their hunts. 

See more in the Akeley Hall of African Mammals

Summer produce still life.

Summer produce still life.

This fine fellow (or lady) visited my office last Friday. I thought it was dead at first. The building had been sprayed for bugs recently, and it was lying there in the middle of my office floor, very still.

I brought it to the attention of a graduate student who had come to my desk, and he in turn found a friend in the soil lab who could identify it: a “sun” or “camel” spider.

"I think it’s dead," I said.

"Let’s find out," Grad Student A said, reaching a thick finger towards the arachnid’s thorax.

In a split second, the bug flipped a 180 degree turnabout and thrust its little forlegs/pedipalps angrily at the student. Its ferocity belied its size. I took a picture from behind the bug, and it lifted its head and glared at me over its thorax, its eyes shining.

"I hear it has a nasty bite," Grad Student B said as he left my office. 

I could have smashed it, but I did not. It left under its own recognisance. 

artingeneral:

I met a traveller from an antique land Who said: “Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand, Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command Tell that its sculptor well those passions read Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things, The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed. And on the pedestal these words appear: `My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings: Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!’ Nothing beside remains. Round the decay Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare, The lone and level sands stretch far away”.
Text: Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley, published in 1818. Image: Donald Judd, Untitled, 1980-1984

artingeneral:

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: “Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown
And wrinkled lip and sneer of cold command
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.
And on the pedestal these words appear:
`My name is Ozymandias, King of Kings:
Look on my works, ye mighty, and despair!’
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare,
The lone and level sands stretch far away”.


Text: Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley, published in 1818.
Image: Donald Judd, Untitled, 1980-1984

iamjapanese:

Jared Rue

Morning Shore   2013   oil on canvas

Alpine Mist    oil on canvas

Tidal Inlet    2012  oil on canvas

Refuge   2014   oil and aluminum on canvas over panel

Aeris    2014   oil and copper on canvas

iamjapanese:

HOSOKIBARA Seiki( 細木原青起 Japanese, 1885-1958)
Wind Blowing from Mt. Fuji
ink, color, and azurite on silk

iamjapanese:

HOSOKIBARA Seiki( 細木原青起 Japanese, 1885-1958)

Wind Blowing from Mt. Fuji

ink, color, and azurite on silk

helenepertl:

happy friday everybody

Fat baby/ cute boy/ hormones raging

helenepertl:

happy friday everybody

Fat baby/ cute boy/ hormones raging